Build a Business Like Howard Stern

Howard Stern WCQJIf there is one thing that you can learn from artists and businessmen, it’s that you can draw inspiration from practically anything, even from the mundane or offbeat. That is, if you keep an open mind.

Offensive, outspoken, controversial. These are just some of the ideas people often associate with radio host Howard Stern’s name.

His critics may not run out of horrible words to say about the King of All Media, but if you look closely at his success, from his career in radio to his foray into writing books and even TV shows, you’d know that he’s on to something really good and that you can pick up several lessons from him.

Here’s how you can build a brand like Howard Stern:

Be Interesting

When Stern opens his mouth, people are sure to listen. It doesn’t matter if you agree with him or not. You may say that’s part of his genius or talent, and it very well may be. The takeaway here is to make your brand interesting to your target audience. No, you do not have to shock them, but you have to find ways to garner attention.

Set Yourself Apart

Apart from the passionate delivery of his opinions, take note that those opinions by themselves are well-formed, even if they go against widely held beliefs. In building your brand, resist the temptation to fit in.

In a crowded niche, the last thing that you want is to fit in and dissolve into the background. Get your brand noticed by differentiating it or, as some people would say, by waving your freak flag.

Define Your Brand

A corollary to becoming interesting and setting your brand apart is defining your brand. What values does it stand for? But apart from being a mantra, your values serve as your rallying cry.

Despite toning down his image for America’s Got Talent, you’ll notice Stern knows how to play his strengths to his advantage even if it means making a few compromises. Stick to your values, bend here and there, but remain true to what you’ve set your sights on.

Build a Community

Stern’s move from terrestrial radio to satellite radio may seem like an altogether bad move that could have resulted in massive losses on his part. Part of Stern’s success can be attributed to his courage to take a risk.

Another aspect of that successful move can be attributed to the loyalty of his fans.

What you can learn here is not only about taking risks and taking advantage of opportunities, more importantly, it is about establishing a solid connection with your followers by constantly reaching out to them.

Howard Stern’s Future at Sirius XM

king of all mediaSirius XM Radio, which is controlled by Liberty Media, would like to keep Howard Stern on the air when his current contract with the company ends, CFO David Frear reiterated on Tuesday.

Speaking at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Telecom and Media Conference, Frear reminded investors that Stern’s contract was coming up at the end of 2015. Last time around, “he signed the contract and said he couldn’t believe he did it again because of how early he has to get up.”

He added, “I do think he loves what he is doing, I think he loves the creative freedom that he gets on the Sirius platform. I think he loves the reach that he gets.”

“As long as Howard wants to work, we’d love to have him on the air.”

Discussing Sirius’ programming lineup, Frear said “there isn’t any piece we are missing” and that “there isn’t anything we wanted to keep that we haven’t kept.”

Billy Joel Town Hall with Howard Stern

Howard Stern doesn’t leave his SiriusXM studio all that often, so if you happen to spot the self-confessed “agoraphobe” out in the open, it’s a big deal.

But there he was, hosting a live Town Hall from New York’s Cutting Room club. And all it took was his good friend Billy Joel to get him there.

For three hours, Stern presided over a lively interview with the media-shy Joel.

During their chat, Joel also revealed the stories behind some of his best-known songs, joked about the multitude of different paths his career could have taken, and let it be know that he has absolutely no plans of making another album.

Howard Stern on Transcendental Meditation (Introduction to TM Technique)

Both Howard Stern and Jerry Seinfeld practice Transcendental Meditation.

The TM technique involves the use of a sound or mantra and is practiced for 15–20 minutes twice per day. It is taught by certified teachers through a standard course of instruction, which costs a fee that varies by country.

According to the Transcendental Meditation movement, it is a method for relaxation, stress reduction and self-development. The technique has been described as both religious and as non-religious by sociologists, scholars, and a New Jersey court case.

How Transcendental Meditation (TM) works:

Practitioners say the technique is just a simple mantra meditation. A word like Isus (pronounced Esus) would work. Researching TM on the internet it seems to involve the following steps:

  1. Closing your eyes.
  2. Waiting about half a minute.
  3. Thinking the mantra over and over again for about 15-20 minutes, twice a day.
  4. At the end of the 15 minutes stop thinking the mantra and wait about 2 minutes before opening the eyes.

Allegedly from the TM instructor: In this meditation, we do not concentrate, we do not try to say the mantra clearly. Mental repetition is not a clear pronunciation, it is just a faint idea.

Like with anything, if you want to learn the proper way to perform Transcendental Meditation you should go to the source: TM.org

Sam Simon dolphin hunt Q&A

Howard Stern Show regular Sam Simon known for his major contributions to animal causes, dodged his doctors and mustered the energy for a six-day trip to Taiji, Japan, to protest the notorious dolphin hunting depicted in The Cove.

How’s it been in Japan?

We have had nice weather here, and now we have got a monsoon coming. We’re getting out just in time. We have been here about a week.

Last year, you had just been diagnosed with cancer and weren’t able to travel on the ship named after you during its anti-whaling mission. Your doctors were okay with this trip?

I don’t tell my doctors anything about what I’m doing. I overextend myself a little sometimes, I admit it. But I think it’s better to do too much than too little. And I’m always happy to skip some chemotherapy.

How are you these days?

Today I’m feeling really good. It’s mainly because I’m not on the chemo. I’ll be sick again next Wednesday when I’m back on it, don’t you worry.

But overall, you’re doing all right?

Generally, but you never know. The other day, my doctor asked me if I had considered putting UCLA’s oncology department in my estate plan. There have been a lot of good days. That was one of the not so good days!

So you’re in Japan to bear witness to the killing of dolphins. Have you seen any slaughter?

When there’s a slaughter, it’s called a “red day” because the cove water turns red. We didn’t actually see a kill. We had all blue days. What we did see was dolphins packed into these miserable pens and dolphins being starved so they learned how to eat dead fish.

What does the Operation Infinite Patience campaign actually do?

Well, we can’t actually interfere with the dolphin hunt, so the only thing we can do is document it and show it to the world on our live stream. We urge people to avoid dolphin shows. People used to eat the dolphin meat; they don’t really do that anymore. So now the dolphins – two- to three-year-old unscarred white females – are just bought alive for shows. The rest are killed and sold for a few hundred dollars a pop.

Japanese traditionalists and nationalists defend the dolphin hunting, arguing that it’s a cultural practice with historic context.

Yes, there’s a Japanese attitude where they don’t want us to tell them how to live their lives. But just because these dolphins migrate past this cove every year doesn’t mean they should be theirs to do with them what they want. And there really isn’t any history to this. The practice started in 1969!

Do you think anti-dolphin-hunting efforts will eventually have an impact?

There are already signs that this is becoming a big global problem for Japan. The U.S. ambassador, Caroline Kennedy, recently called for an end to it. And now they are tarping up everything by the cove to try to stop people from even seeing it from the land. So when people start to act like this, you know you’re making headway.

Howard Stern Birthday Show (Nickel and Dimes Song)

For those who were there, it was like the Super Bowl without the bother of football.

For listeners of the Howard Stern Birthday Bash that aired live Friday on SiriusXM radio, it was like the Golden Globes without the distraction of awards, but with Stern, lots of merry-making celebs, and at least as much free-flowing booze.

Civilian Stern fans joined tribute-paying glitterati like Robert Downey, Jr., Bryan Cranston, Sarah Silverman, Lena Dunham, Ryan Phillippe, Heidi Klum, Fred Armisen, Rosie O’Donnell and Katie Couric at Manhattan’s Hammerstein Ballroom.

Even New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was on hand, taking a brief respite from the political retribution scandal that has engulfed his administration to wish Stern a happy birthday. He reminded everyone who plans to be at Sunday’s Super Bowl that, to get there, they will “have to go to the right side of the (Hudson) river.”

Howard Stern on Conservative Host Bob Grant

Howard Stern was live today, following his two-week vacation. The star opened the show by praising Bob Grant and bashing Rush Limbaugh. These latest comments come before the shock jock’s Birthday Bash. Don’t worry, we’ve got the latest ticket info as well.

Howard started out by talking about how influential Grant was to him. The broadcaster also expressed his frustration with mainstream conservative hosts:

“Bob was really a powerful guy. When Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity became big on Fox News, I was always surprised and angry that Bob didn’t make it. I’ll tell you how influential Bob is, because I remember at the end of each show he would say, ‘Get Gaddafi.’ As I got older, I realized that Bob was right, Gaddafi is a piece of s–t…I think Gaddafi may have f—ed his wife.”

“The best broadcaster I have ever heard is gone. Rest in peace, Bob. I’m such an a–hole…there was a couple of times over the years that Bob reached out to me…I’d write back and there was never a response…and it was so frustrating to me. I always considered him a mentor, even though I never worked with him…just from listening to him.”

Howard further discussed how influential Bob was on the whole family, including his father:

“It was so important to my father, that he took me to see Bob Grant. He was actually speaking at this temple…he started breaking into Yiddish…he knew to throw in these words…it was impressive to me. He knew how to play to a crowd.”

Howard Stern will return for America’s Got Talent Season 9

americas judgeHoward Stern has signed on for a third season of America’s Got Talent.

“It started out as a goof. … Now it’s becoming a job,” he told his listeners, saying he thought he’d only do it for one season. He added that he struggled with the decision to return to AGT because I’ve been working a long time.

I really wanted to decide if this was going to take away too much … free time. Did I really still enjoy doing it? Did I have something to say? Is it something I should be involved with still?”

He said wife Beth Stern prodded him to “just make a decision already. She couldn’t take it [anymore].”

Stern noted that NBC has been accommodating of his schedule, which has made him feel “very special.” He also admitted that in the grand scheme of things, struggling over whether to return to judge a reality show was “silly.”

CNN’s Piers Morgan on Howard Stern

CNN’s very own Piers Morgan sat down with legendary broadcaster Howard Stern. The interview took an odd turn when Morgan seemingly blamed his low ratings on there being a lack of news to cover. Despite his claims, Fox News’ Megyn Kelly doesn’t seem to be struggling.

Howard and Piers have been friends for quite some time now, but Stern didn’t hold back from reminding the Brit of some advice he once offered. The shock jock told the journalist that hosting a prime time news program wasn’t going to be as easy as he thought.